Beckett

Operating System:

Windows

Platform:

Steam

$9.99
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Beckett

Beckett by The Secret Experiment is a surreal noir. A disturbing story of a missing-persons investigator, hired to find a young man suffering from a mental illness. It is a taste of the alternative - an experience that will make you question what it is to exist. It is a vivid musing on identity, memory and loss.
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Categoría: Aventuras | Publisher: KISS | Age Limit: 16+ | Developer: The Secret Experiment | Release Date: 26/02/2018
Descripción del juego

Steam account required for game activation and installation Windows System Requirements MINIMUM: Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system OS: A 64-bit operating system is required spanning from Windows 7 SP1 and up. Processor: Intel Core i3-2100 processor or an AMD equivalent Memory: 4 GB RAM Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GTX 660 (2GB) or AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB) graphics card Storage: 5 GB available space RECOMMENDED: Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system OS: Windows 10 Processor: Intel Core i7-3770K or AMD FX 8350 Wraith Graphics: AMD Radeon RX 480 - 1920 x 1080 or NVIDIA GTX 970 - 1920 x 1080 Storage: 5 GB available space Mac System Requirements MINIMUM: Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system OS: MacOS 10.11.6 or Newer Processor: 3.0GHz Intel Core i5 Memory: 4 GB RAM Graphics: 2GB AMD R9 M290 or better Storage: 5 GB available space RECOMMENDED: Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system OS: MacOS 10.11.6 or Newer Processor: 2.3 GHz Intel Core i7 Memory: 16 GB RAM Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M 2048 MB Storage: 5 GB available space

Beckett is a top-down, narrative adventure game that follows an ageing private investigator, whose brain is riddled with disease and hallucinations, on his final case.

This is an original IP by The Secret Experiment; a new work of paranoid fiction set in a world of high-contrast and extremes, where beauty is misunderstood and the human desire to control is captured in a society that wears insects as living jewellery. Beckett himself is from a different era and doesn’t conform to typical notion of the hero. He is a character with bad hygiene, who has let go of life and is tormented by memories of his dead wife - a back story the player will unpick over the course of the game.

The story is told on a visual landscape that defies description, where each location is painted as a reflection of our main character’s emotional state - a subjective morphing of the place, its objects and characters. As such, this is a game that engages the player’s imagination and - like a good book - allows the audience to become an integral part of the experience.

Tonally, the experience echoes David Lynch’s Eraserhead, David Cronenberg’s Naked Lunch and Cohen Brother’s No Country For Old Men. It has an emotional maturity and depth of content that isn’t normally found or associated with games. And with its unique art style and innovative interaction mechanics, we hope Beckett catch the attention of players who are after more than just an adrenaline rush.

The Player controls Beckett though a familiar point-and-click style interface. However, there’s no tenuous pixel hunting or obscure logic puzzles here. The game system has been designed to draw the player in and keep them there - not dislocating the experience with unnecessary elements.

This isn’t to say that Beckett doesn’t have a rich pallet of interactivity and thought-provoking mechanics, however.

The interaction system has been tailored to the story and every element is designed to underpin its emotional beats - the player will be called upon to interact in a number of different ways. The end result is something that feels tactile and human - in many ways un-game-like.

The experience itself lasts around 2 hours, but with a high-proportion of evocative archive and textual content that could extend this duration.

Notions of Choice and Chance are present throughout the experience - where the player is called upon to sway Beckett’s reactions to certain situations and play a part where skill is necessary. These moments add to the overall flow of the narrative and will ultimately shape the end of the story (or at least the options that are open to Beckett at the end).

THE STORY:
Beckett receives a call from a pushy woman named Daisy Starlight who insists he look into the disappearance of her son, Peregrine. Beckett refuses ‘I don’t do domestic cases’, but is forced to reconsider after a chance meeting with the City Representative, an official who has a hold on the private investigator and explains that Daisy ‘is on his list’. He passes Beckett a small cardboard box and asks him to plant the Larvae inside on Ms Starlight.

Becket arrives at Ms Starlight’s home - she is dressed to impress and everything feels staged. He discovers that Peregrine (27) is suffering from the Soft Paranoia and had been briefly institutionalised after a break-down in his City job. He now lives with his mother and uncle in a run downestate in Borough. Daisy is concerned as he didn’t show up at his new job at his uncle’s Labour Yard yesterday and hasn’t returned home. Beckett searches the house and finds an array of Theatre Tickets, an Earwig collection and an odd wooden box with number-lock. He also notices flowers on table that Daisy reveals are a passion of Peregrine’s (he steels them from Monument Park). Before leaving, Beckett drops the Larvae into Ms Starlight’s bag.

Beckett visits the Hospital, Theatre, Park and Labour Yard and starts to discover the true character of Peregrine and his unhealthy obsessions - namely frequenting Borough’s sleazy night-club The Shore. Each location throws us deeper into world of Borough and its bizarre characters and themes, while also getting under the skin of who ‘Beckett’ is and understanding his torment soul. The City Representative appears in different guises and keeps a check on Beckett’s actions.

As the day draws on, Beckett finds himself at The Insect Bowl, a expensive restaurant where he observes a table of Pregnant women drinking vintage champagne and discussing illicit affairs. He heads into the night and towards The Shore where he meets Black Alice (who talks to Beckett as a friend). The Shore is a melting pot of the world in which Beckett lives, here are corrupt politicians, the desperate working classes and gaudy rich.

A dream overtakes Beckett where we discover more about the investigator’s chequered past. He wakes (dream ends) in an unknown bedroom, alongside an unknown woman. On the bedside table is Peregrine’s wooden box. He opens the lock and inside there are a number of pebbles and shells.

Beckett heads back to his Office, which he finds has been broken into and his filing cabinets spilled on the floor. The loft space has also been pulled apart and he finds to his distress that his personal artefacts have been stolen - all of the pictures of his wife (Amy) are gone, all he has left is the one in his jacket pocket and in his memory (which is fading).

Beckett heads to Borough’s beach - it is pebbly with shells. He trudges along its shoreline until he encounters Peregrine, who is throwing stones into the sea. It is early morning, the sun is rising against the water. The two chat about the nature of existence and Peregrine asks Beckett is he is real, Beckett says we’re real so long as at least one person wants us to be. His mother is waiting for him at home. As Peregrine leaves, Beckett considers. On the horizon the sun grows and we notice an imposing structure (a military base). Beckett either walks into the distance, heading towards the military base or walks back along the beach taking his pills for the Soft Paranoia.

TECHNICAL:

    • Beckett is created in Unity 5.

    • Beckett’s primary platform is PC (mouse and controller support), but we are capable of formatting and delivering for Playstation 4 (we have development kit) and high-end tablets.

    • It is designed to run at resolutions up to 4k (HDR).

    • Beckett uses anXML-based localisation-ready system for all of its textual elements. Currently Beckett is in English only.

  • The audio components are spacial and binaural - meaning that they fill the room (and headphones) in an incredibly realistic way.



THE SECRET EXPERIMENT:
Incorporated Nov 2013

We are progressive videogames development studio based in the heart of Glasgow, Scotland, making original content for players who want more than just an adrenaline rush.

As a team, we are united by the desire for better, bolder storytelling in videogames and the development of new forms of interactive expression using the latest technology.

We see ourselves at the intersection of industries and pride ourselves on creating product that are much greater than the sum of the parts. Our work is always evocative, emotional and captivating - pushing boundaries and exploring new ways to create incredible character-led experiences.

The Secret Experiment is a micro-studio, we feel it works better that way. We’re hugely experienced (50+ years combined) with a contact book of brilliant contractors that we’ve worked with when the requirement arises. We’re also not shy to collaborate to make the best product.